Elysium
ancientpeoples:

Terracotta head of a lion 
22.9cm high and 20.6cm wide (9 x 8 1/4 inch.)
Greek, Archaic Period, 6th century BC.
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta head of a lion 

22.9cm high and 20.6cm wide (9 x 8 1/4 inch.)

Greek, Archaic Period, 6th century BC.

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

an-amateur-roman:

For Halloween this year instead of buying a costume just be Socrates by asking young trick or treaters deep philosophical questions

leightimtam:

leightimtam:

NONO NO NO NO SO I HAD CLASS WITH MY LIT TEACHER TODAY AND HIS LEFT ARM IS AMPUTATED FROM JUST BELOW THE ELBOW AND HE WAS HAVING A LITTLE TROUBLE PUTTING THE PAPERS ON HIS DESK INTO HIS BREIF CASE AT THE END OF THE CLASS AND I GO TO HIM AND SAY “YOU NEED A HAND?” AND ITS SILENT AND I JUST WHISPER OH NO AND HE STARTS LAUGHING HYSTERICALLY I WAS SO EMBARASSED

Who reblogged his

Why are there so many notes

buzzfeed:

Animal puns? ANIMAL PUNS!

nightofthelivingfig:

Just needed to put this on your dash. 

stoleyogirl:

I don’t care if this isn’t your blog type, if you don’t reblog this I’m judg-

image

amightydirge:

Crossbow with Cranequin Mechanism

Date: 1556 

Culture: Austrian-Tyrolese

Medium: Steel, wood, mother-of-pearl, ivory

As crossbows became more popular in Europe, military engineers sought to increase their range and power. The basic problem was one of reloading - an extremely powerful crossbow, conversely, would be extremely difficult to reset. Eventually, human strength was not enough, so mechanical advantages were implemented. The cranequin above, now housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, used the rotational motion of a crank to impart mechanical leverage to its user. 

Mechanical leverage allowed crossbows to become extremely deadly. Cranequin crossbows could unleash a bolt with a force in excess of 500 lb. By comparison, the famed English longbowmen, with their heavy warbows, used bows with an average poundage of 150 lb. Though they were devastating, cranequins were not the most powerful mechanism developed for crossbows. The windlass crossbow, which used dual cranks and a pulley system, could handle up to an astonishing 1,200 lb. 

Cranequins were highly popular with elite crossbowmen of the era, such as the Genoese. Windlass crossbows were usually only used in siege situations, where their long reload time was less of a concern. 

Either way, crossbows were devastating and effective, allowing poor, barely trained peasants to kill armored knights. Crossbows, then, can be seen as the first everyman’s weapon - a predecessor to the firearm in terms of cultural and societal impact. 

spookyscandal:

can i make it any more obvious?

spookyscandal:

can i make it any more obvious?